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Wartburg Castle

Welcome to Rome Across Europe!

It’s time to take a look at another UNESCO World Heritage Site. Today we’re in the countryside of Germania as we explore Wartburg Castle!

Wartburg Castle blends superbly into its forest surroundings and is in many ways “the ideal castle”. Although it contains some sections of great antiquity, it acquired the current layout over the course of 19th Century reconstructions.

Today the castle continues to be a symbol of the nation’s past and present, standing as a splendid example of what this fortress might have been at the peak of its military and seigneurial power. What makes Wartburg Castle such a magnet for memory, tradition, and pilgrimage is that it stands as a monument to the cultural history of Germany, Europe, and beyond.

Wartburg Castle is perched at a height of some 1,312 feet above the delightful countryside, south of the city of Eisenach in Thuringia in central Germany. Its varied aspect and the sense of harmony it evokes are only 2 of its attractions for visitors.

Lutherans the world over know of the castle as the very place where Martin Luther made his translation of the Bible. The veneration of Saint Elizabeth, which extends far beyond the frontiers of Germany, includes Wartburg Castle where she lived and worked.

 

The patronage of Hermann I, Landgrave of Thuringia, occupies an extraordinary place in the creation of a national literary tradition. In poetry and in legends, Wartburg Castle, the medieval Court of the Muses, bears an undying reputation through the names of Walther von der Vogelweide and Wolfram von Eschenbach.

 

Wartburg Castle is also associated with the beginnings of a bourgeois and democratic nation, through the content and effects of the Wartburg festival of German students’ associations. From the very earliest days of its existence, this fortress of the Landgraves of Thuringia has repeatedly acted as a venue for and witness of historic events and activities worthy of renown as a monument to national and world history.

 

The artistic and architectural importance of the palace, built in the latter half of the 12th Century, is no less significant. In execution and ornamentation, it is unrivalled and represents one of the best-preserved secular constructions from the late Norman period to be found on German soil. Thanks to this broad range of religious content and historic data, and because of its significance in the history of the arts, Wartburg Castle attracts around half a million visitors every year, from all over the world.

How This Relates To Ancient Rome:

Germania was the Roman term for the geographical region in north-central Europe inhabited mainly by Germanic peoples.

It extended from the Danube in the south to the Baltic Sea, and from the Rhine in the west to the Vistula. The Roman portions formed two provinces of the EmpireGermania Inferior to the north (present-day Netherlands, Belgium, and western Germany), and Germania Superior to the south (Switzerland, southwestern Germany, and eastern France).

Germania was inhabited mostly by Germanic tribes, but also Celtsearly SlavsBalts and Scythians. The population mix changed over time by assimilation, and especially by migration. The ancient Greeks were the first to mention the tribes in the area.

Later, Julius Caesar wrote about warlike Germanic tribesmen and their threat to Roman Gaul, and there were military clashes between the Romans and the indigenous tribes. Tacitus wrote the most complete account of Germania that still survives.

The origin of the term Germania is uncertain, but was known by Caesar’s time, and may be Gallic in origin.

We hope you enjoyed today’s adventure. We look forward to sharing more World Heritage Sites, along with many other explorations.

Till next time, Don’t Stop Rome-ing!

Travel With Kids – Rome, Vatican City & the Amalfi Coast

Welcome to Rome Across Europe!

After traveling with my wife and infant son to see family for Christmas, I got to thinking “What will traveling be like when our boy’s older? Where will we take him to make some wonderful memories?”

Last week we shared Travel With Kids – Rome to showcase all that can be seen and experienced in the Eternal City while traveling with children. We thought that was a good idea and looked for more videos to share.

Today we present to you Travel With Kids – Rome, Vatican City & the Amalfi Coast!

If you enjoyed today’s adventure and want to see more like it, and maybe even about different locations, check out their site here.

We wish you a great 2017 filled with endless possibilities. Come back soon to see what we have in store for you.

Till next time, Don’t Stop Rome-ing!

Frontiers of the Roman Empire

Welcome to Rome Across Europe!

It’s time to take a look at another UNESCO World Heritage Site. Today we’re back in Britannia as we head explore the Frontiers of the Roman Empire!

The Roman Limes represents the border line of the Imperium Rōmānum at its greatest extent in the 2nd Century AD. It stretched over 3,107 miles from the Atlantic coast of northern Britain, through Europe to the Black Sea, and from there to the Red Sea and across North Africa to the Atlantic coast.

 

The remains of the Limes today consist of remnants of built walls, ditches, forts, fortresses, watchtowers, and civilian settlements. Certain elements of the line have been excavated, some reconstructed and a few destroyed.

The 2 sections of the Limes in Germania cover a length of 342 miles from the north-west of the country to the Danube in the south-east. The 73-mile-long Hadrian’s Wall (UK) was built on the orders of the Emperor Hadrian c. AD 122 at the northernmost limits of the Roman provincia of Britannia.

It is a striking example of the organization of a military zone and illustrates the defensive techniques and geopolitical strategies of Ancient Rome. The Antonine Wall, a 37-mile-long fortification in Alba was started by Emperor Antoninus Pius in AD 142 as a defense against the “barbarians” of the north. It constitutes the northwestern-most portion of the Roman Limes.

We hope you enjoyed today’s journey. We look forward to you joining us again soon for further adventures.

Till next time, Don’t Stop Rome-ing!

Travel With Kids – Venice

Welcome to Rome Across Europe!

After traveling with my wife and infant son to see family for Christmas, I got to thinking “What will traveling be like when our boy’s older? Where will we take him to make some wonderful memories?”

We’ve already shared Travel With Kids – Rome and Travel With Kids – Rome, Vatican City & the Amalfi Coast to showcase all that can be seen and experienced in the Eternal City (and Italy‘s coast) while traveling with children. We thought that was a good idea and looked for more videos to share.

Today we present to you Travel With Kids – Venice!

If you enjoyed today’s adventure and want to see more like it, and maybe even about different locations, check out their site here.

We wish you a great 2017 filled with endless possibilities. Come back soon to see what we have in store for you.

Till next time, Don’t Stop Rome-ing!

Episcopal Complex of the Euphrasian Basilica in the Historic Centre of Poreč

Welcome to Rome Across Europe!

It’s time to take a look at another UNESCO World Heritage Site. Today we’re back in Europe as we head to Croatia to explore the Episcopal Complex of the Euphrasian Basilica in the Historic Centre of Poreč!

The group of religious monuments in Porec, where Christianity was established as early as the 4th Century, constitutes the most complete surviving complex of its type. The basilica, atrium, baptistery and episcopal palace are outstanding examples of religious architecture, while the basilica itself combines classical and Byzantine elements in an exceptional manner.

 

The present basilica, dedicated to Mary, was built in the 6th Century during the period of Bishop Euphrasius. It was built in AD 553 on the site of the older basilica that had become dilapidated.

For the construction, parts of the former church were used and the marble blocks were imported from the coast of the Sea of Marmara. The wall mosaics were executed by Byzantian masters and the floor mosaics by local experts.

The construction took about 10 years. Euphrasius, holding the church in his arms, is represented on one of the mosaics on the apse, next to St. Maurus.

Following the earthquake of 1440 the southern wall of the central nave of the basilica was restored. In place of the windows which were destroyed, others were built in the Gothic style.

How This Relates To Ancient Rome:

The earliest basilica was dedicated to Saint Maurus of Parentium and dates back to the second half of the 4th Century. The floor mosaic from its oratory, originally part of a large Roman house, is still preserved in the church garden.

This oratorium was already expanded in the same century into a church composed of a nave and one aisle (basilicae geminae). The fish on the floor mosaic dates from this period. Coins with the portrayal of Emperor Valens (365–378), found in the same spot, confirm these dates.

We hope you enjoyed today’s travel. We look forward to having you back again soon for more adventures.

Till next time, Don’t Stop Rome-ing!

Travel Kids – Rome

Welcome to Rome Across Europe and to 2017!

During the course of this holiday season my wife & I have been traveling with our son for the first time. Granted he’s only a year old and we stayed within the United States, it was our first time on a plane as a family.

This got me thinking, what will traveling be like when our boy’s older? Where will we take him to make some wonderful memories?

How will traveling with a child (or children) be? The last time I traveled with children, I was one of the children.

So today, to start a new year, we present to you Travel With Kids -Rome!

If you enjoyed today’s adventure and want to see more like it, and maybe even about different locations, check out their site here.

We wish you a great 2017 filled with endless possibilities. Come back soon to see what we have in store for you.

Till next time, Don’t Stop Rome-ing!

Seven Wonders of Ancient Rome

Welcome to Rome Across Europe!

With 2017 just hours away, we are busy getting ready for some fun. However, we still thought we should end the year with something lively, educational and entertaining (of course).

That is why today we bring to you the Seven Wonders of Ancient Rome!

Able to inspire wonder and awe in all who gazed upon them, the Seven Wonders of Ancient Rome – the Pantheon, the Aqueducts of Rome, the Via Appia, the Baths of Caracalla, Trajan’s Markets, the Circus Maximus and  the Colosseum – were the works of great men who translated fantastic visions into the epitome of human achievement. These visionaries included ambitious Emperors like Hadrian and engineers with revolutionary ideas such as Apollodorus of Damascus.

By the 2nd Century AD, Rome had become the Caput Mundi (Head of the World). Architectural marvels with a clear civic purpose such as roads and aqueducts stood alongside constructions of great beauty and immense luxury.

They transformed Rome into one of the greatest cities of Classical Antiquity and the Roman Empire into a vast monument to the genius of its architects. We recreate Rome’s ancient streets, fly over its aqueducts and walk beneath the shadow of her impressive arches.

By investigating the minds of the Emperors, architects and engineers behind them, we reveal the mysteries of constructions that changed the world.

Thanks for stopping by today. Please celebrate New Year’s Eve safe and responsibly, so we can see you back in 2017.

Till next time, Don’t Stop Rome-ing!

 

 

 

The CRAZIEST Things Ancient Romans Did!

Welcome to Rome Across Europe!

Sometimes we find it nice to just kick up our feet and relax. If we can watch something both entertaining AND educational, then we truly are amongst the gods.

So we bring to you a top list of 20 historical facts you probably didn’t know about the Roman Empire.

From bloody gladiator fights at the Colosseum (aka the Flavian Amphitheatre) to insane Emperors drinking poison. From women sporting a unibrow to gluttony to the point of vomiting.

Find out what Julius Caesar and the Senate were really up to. Enjoy!

We hope you were entertained as we were, and maybe you even learned something new about Ancient Rome. Stop by again soon to see what we have in store for you.

Till next time, Don’t Stop Rome-ing!

Millenary Benedictine Abbey of Pannonhalma and its Natural Environment

Welcome to Rome Across Europe!

It’s time to take a look at another UNESCO World Heritage Site. Today we’re back in Europe as we head to Hungary to explore the Millenary Benedictine Abbey of Pannonhalma and its Natural Environment!

The monastery of the Benedictine Order at Pannonhalma, founded in AD 996 and gently dominating the Pannonian landscape in western Hungary, had a major role in the diffusion of Christianity in Medieval Central Europe. The Archabbey of Pannonhalma and its environment (the monastic complex, the Basilica, educational buildings, the Chapel of Our Lady, the Millennium Chapel, the botanical and herbal gardens) outstandingly exemplifies the characteristic location, landscape connections, original structure, design and a thousand year history of a Benedictine monastery.

The community of monks still functions today on the basis of the Rule of St. Benedict, and sustains with a unique continuity one of the living centers of European culture.

The present church, the building of which began in 1224, is the third on the site and contains remains of its predecessors. The elevated 3-aisled choir, the oldest part of the building, overlies a similarly 3-aisled crypt, probably an element of the earlier church on the site.

The main south door, known as the Porta Speciosa, is faced with red marble and flanked by 5 pairs of columns. It has undergone several transformations and reconstructions since it was originally built in the 13th Century.

This door gives access to the Cloister, a typical square Late Gothic ensemble built in 1486. The vaulting springs form consoles that are elaborately decorated with symbolic motifs. The doors and windows were given their present form in the 1880s. Sculptured stones from the Romanesque cloister were found during studies carried out in the 1960s, when the door leading into the medieval refectory, with small red marble columns, also came to light.

The Millenary Monument is 1 of 7 erected to commemorate the thousandth anniversary of the conquest of Hungary in AD 896. It is located at the crest of the central hill, where it replaced the Calvary that is now located in front of the Chapel of our Lady.

It consists of a single block, constructed in brick and limestone. The stone portico is formed of a tympanum bearing a symbolic relief, supported on 2 pairs of Ionic columns. It was originally surmounted by a dome 85 feet high on a high drum, but this had to be removed in 1937-38 because of its severe deterioration.

How This Relates To Ancient Rome:

The Roman Empire conquered the territory west of the Danube between 35 and 9 BC. From 9 BC to the end of the 4th Century, Pannonia was part of the Roman Empire, located within part of later Hungary’s territory.

Here, a 600-strong Roman Legion created the settlement Aquincum in AD 41–54. A civil city grew gradually in the neighborhood of the military settlement, and in AD 106 Aquincum became the focal point of the commercial life of this area and the capital city of the Pannonia Inferior region.

This area now corresponds to the Óbuda district of Budapest, with the Roman ruins now forming part of the modern Aquincum museum. Later came the Huns, who built a powerful empire, followed by the Germanic Ostrogoths, Lombards, Gepids, and the polyethnic Avars in the Carpathian Basin.

We appreciate you stopping by and look forward to having you back again. Make sure to check us out daily for you never know what’s in store.

Till next time, Don’t Stop Rome-ing!

Roman War Tactics

Welcome to Rome Across Europe!

If this is your initial visit to RAE, then be prepared to have your mind blown (at least that’s what the video tells us). We cover a lot of things, both past and present, that have a connection to the Ancient Rome and the Roman Empire.

Today we are in for a visual treat as we explore Roman War Tactics!

Roman war tactics refers to the theoretical and historical deployment, formation and maneuvers of the Roman Infantry from the start of the Roman Republic to the fall of the Western Roman Empire.

For in depth background on the historical structure of the infantry relevant to this article, see Structure of the Roman military. For a history of Rome’s military campaigns see Campaign history of the Roman military. For detail on equipment, daily life and specific Legions see Roman Legion and Roman military personal equipment.

We hope you enjoyed today’s adventure and look forward to having you back again soon.

Till next time, Don’t Stop Rome-ing!